Briefer on the new Malacañang Briefing Room signage

History

In the original signage adopted during the 1986 administration of President Corazon C. Aquino for use in the RTVM studio in Kalayaan Hall (today’s restored Quirino Council of State room) the Palace riverfront façade prior to martial law was portrayed: this was a combination of the arched riverfront balcony erected during the era of the American governors-general, the two towers built during the Commonwealth, and the ground-floor hall also originally built during the Commonwealth but renovated and turned into an arched arcade during the administration of Diosdado Macapagal.

The Estrada administration's "half-moon" Malacañang sign
The Estrada administration's "half-moon" Malacañang sign

The Arroyo-era signage
The Arroyo-era signage

The oval signage was changed during the Estrada administration to a half-moon shape with a version of the blue background in current use. It was changed again during the Arroyo administration—when the briefing room was relocated to the New Executive Building—with a few variations before the more familiar one in use today was adopted.

2011 Revision

The 2011 signage for the Press Briefing Room of the New Executive Building is the latest update since 1986. The present modified design harmonizes the elements of past official signage, incorporating the famous Pasig River façade of the Palace with its arched windows and two towers, the name of the official residence and its location. The background color is the national blue, as used in the national flag and presidential seal. The font used is in keeping with the traditional typography used in official stationery since the Commonwealth era.

The 2011-version Malacañang signage, with the noticeable arched balcony
The 2011-version Malacañang signage, with the noticeable arched balcony

Virtually the entire historic structure of the Palace itself was rebuilt in 1978, drastically enlarging the Palace. This was first portrayed in the 1985 revision of the 20-peso bill, and in official signage during the Estrada administration. In 2003, the riverfront façade was further renovated to reproduce the wrought-iron grillwork of the premartial law-era presidential palace and this renovation is now reflected in the new signage

Malacañan

In 1986, by means of her presidential issuances, President Corazon C. Aquino officially restored the designation of Malacañan Palace for the residence of the President of the Philippines—it had officially been changed to Malacañang in 1953 during the Magsaysay administration. A distinction was made between Malacañan Palace as the designation for the official residence of the President, and Malacañang as shorthand for the Office of the President of the Philippines.

This is why, for example, today, executive issuances such as Executive Orders and Proclamations personally signed by the President of the Philippines bear the header Malacañan Palace, while executive issuances delegated to subordinates and signed by them, bear the heading Malacañang. President Corazon Aquino’s restoration of the designation Malacañan Palace was reflected in official stationery, and signage, including the backdrop for press briefings and conferences featuring the Pasig River façade of the Palace.

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